Friday, March 02, 2007

California’s Gun Gestapo And The Media Goosestep Over Another Gun Collector.

Norco-This time is was a house fire. Responding firemen found a garage full of ammunition and called the cops. The result was the total confiscation of the owner, 62 year-old, Thomas McKiernan's property.

Of course an imbecile from KTLA-TV news had to sensationalize this and portray the quiet owner as some kind of terrorist. There’s obviously is no right to keep and bear arms in the Bolshevik Republic of California.

I have a question for TV reporter Bill Smith. What exactly is a, “machine gun bullet”? Don’t bother answering Bill, we know that you don’t have a clue what you’re babbling about.

Sit back and watch KTLA-TV throw gasoline on this fire.


Here is an update with a list of allegations.

9 comments:

It's Not All Real said...

With that stockpile of ammunition and powder, you need to make sure it's stored safely. The number is meaningless really. If the house had gone up completely, there would have been an obvious safety hazard.

Just what is "too much" ammo anyway? Personnaly, I have "thousands" of rounds of ammunition. Yeah, four bricks of .22, maybe 4 boxes of .357, some boxes of rifle rounds and shotgun shells, and don't forget the 1,000 bullets and primers, along with a pound of gunpowder to reload target bullets. There are plenty of people who would think I'm crazy. Personally, I don't think I am. Guns don't wear out like a pair of shoes. Buy a rifle one year, a pistol the next, you still have them. Besides, guns are fine pieces of machinery and worth collecting....at least I think so.

If there is a law broken, the only one I can see would be a fire code violation for volatile material storage. Otherwise, owning firearms and ammunition is a guaranteed right under the Constitution....or at least it's supposed to be.

Assuming this man has not been convicted of a felony, will he get his weapons and ammo back?

Anonymous said...

california is a s***hole that shouldnt be a part of this country.

Anonymous said...

I don't see what the issue is here, except for a possible fire code violation regarding the storage of the ammo. Is it against the law to own a specific number of weapons? I don't think so. Same goes for ammo. So why did the police take him into custody? Maybe they were caught up in the media frenzy and thought that they just had to do something, when a better approach would have been to think it out a bit before taking action. First, if they could think of a criminal code violation, then fine, arrest the guy. But since I don't live in Kalifornia I'm not aware of the laws out there. If this happened in Illinois, I can't see the guy getting arrested unless he lived in Chicago.

Anonymous said...

I guess no one at the station was a boy scout. I remember some af us would always throw a few .22 cartridges in the campfire and wait for them to pop. The NRA did a study of ammunition and fire several years back, and found a 30-06 bullet or case would not penetrate a 2X2 cardboard box placed over the cartridge. I know the movies have people killed by exploding small arms ammunition, but without the means to direct the pressure, the case pops like a firecracker.

thebronze said...

This is such bullsh*t!

I must've missed the part of the CA Penal Code that says it's illegal to possess ammunition in your own home.

Or to have a loaded rifle (or twenty) in your own home...

Or to have black-powder in your own home...

Or to have barrels of food in your own home...

Or to make your own basement in your own home...

What a bunch of fascists.

Al said...

I can but wonder if the mysterious "Tunnel in the floor", (what a hoot), might have been the starting point for a safe storage magazine. Whatever it was it was NOT any concern of neighbors or police officers or moronic news reporters. {Lions and Tigers and Bears, Oh My!} The video showed where the priorities of the PRK police were...the man was obviously hurting and probably had smoke in his lungs...so, Let's cuff him and yank him back and forth on the way to the patrol car.
Cops like those guys make me cringe at being a retired cop. I hope the man sues them and takes every cent they ever tried to have and anything else they own. They can't go to New Orleans and kick around a 62 year old lady and STEAL her antique revolver. So they'll probably steal eveything that guy owned.

Anonymous said...

Stupid reporters with his stupid voice and the stupid people who haven't a clue. I hope the owner sues the PD for all they are worth.

Bill Hilburn said...

I know an officer who was one of the first responders to the scene. The "machine gun" ammunition was 7.62x51mm linked for use in a M-60 or other compatible chain gun. As far as the amount of ammunition, who cares as long as it is stored safely. I probably have 10K on hand at any one kind. The 75 pounds of black powder is another matter. In my home town posession of more than 10 pounds of BP in a residence is a violation of the fire code. I never keep more than five pounds, as if I were to have a fire, and investigators could show I had more, it would void my homeowner's insurance. I probably have 50 pounds of smokeless powder for reloading (I shoot at least 500 rounds of varied ammo each month), but it is kept in a "weak wall" powder magazine. I would be pretty pissed if I found that my next door neighbor had 75 pounds of BP in his garage. I think doing that is pretty irresponsible. I that the reason for the tunnel under the garage will be a telling matter. I've been around all kinds of gun owners, but never knew one who had a tunnel, except David Koresh. Gun owners need to stand together if we are to stop the gun grabbers, but we have to be careful not to throw our weight behind fringe characters, we can get painted with a broad brush. We need to know a lot more about this before we go too far.

Crimefile said...

Just because ammunition is linked on belts does not make it, “machinegun ammunition”. There are semi-automatic M-60s out there for collectors that are not banned by California’s bogus and un-Constitutional so-called “assault weapons” ban. California’s gun-grabbers did not even know they existed. That California law is sure to fall in light of the Parker case in D.C.

As for black powder storage, so what? The gasoline in automobile gas tanks is in fact just as dangerous than this guy’s 75 lbs black powder.

Only an imbecile would demonize a gun collector as “fringe character”. Suggesting David Koresh was somehow evil because members of his group were gun dealers and such is an outrage. Koresh was nothing more or less than a person engaged in constitutionally protected activities in America. Clinton Administration criminals murdered Koresh and his followers. They should be brought to justice for their despicable mass-murders